Kitchen Fires

The majority of all home fires start in the kitchen. Protect your family from kitchen fires by following simple rules:
  • Stay in kitchen while food is cooking.
  • Turn off stove before leaving kitchen.
  • Keep pot handles turned inwards.
  • Avoid fat & oil spatters by using cover.
  • Avoid totally filling pots & saucepans.
  • Heat oil & fats carefully as they catch fire easily.
  • Store flammables away from heat.
  • Do not use water to put out an oil fire.
  • Use a dry powder extinguisher, a fire blanket or a saucepan lid.
Store flammables away from heat.  Do not use water to put out an oil fire. Use a dry powder extinguisher, a fire blanket or a saucepan lid.

ELECTRICAL FIRES IN YOUR HOME

  • Regularly  check  the  cords  on  your  appliances.  Have  damaged  cords  repaired  by  a tradesperson.
  • Turn off your appliances. Unplug them when you are not using them.
  • Make sure TVs, videos, stereos and portable heaters have good air circulation.
  • Use double adaptors and power boards appropriately. Ÿ Do not join extension cords. Use an extension cord that is the correct length.
  • Empty the crumbs from the bottom of your toaster regularly.
  • Make sure the extension cord is straight and on top of the floor coverings.
  • Light globes are hot. Don’t put material over the lamp.
  • Use a lower wattage globe to dim the light.
  • Only use electrical appliances in dry areas.
  • Allow your hair dryer to cool before storing it.

TAKE CARE WITH OPEN FIRES

  • Tablecloths and curtains can catch fire easily.
  • Keep all matches and lighters away from children.
  • Use a child resistant lighter and a deep ashtray.
  • All open flames should be extinguished before you leave home or retire for the night.
  • Candles and oil burners should be used only when an adult is present.
  • Only use candles & oil burners on a safe surface. Avoid them being knocked over.
Open-fires-content

SMOKE DETECTORS

Just a reminder to check the batteries in your smoke detector on a regular basis. Many detectors emit a warning sound when the batteries are low, but would you trust your life on it? A safer approach is to trigger the test button on the unit with a broom handle or similar object from time to time. Some people replace the batteries in their smoke detectors regularly when they change their clocks at this time of the year for daylight saving, so they never get caught with flat batteries.